What say you? (Revelation 5:13)

Do you think that all creation (redeemed man, fallen man, holy angels, the demons, etc) will one day offer some form of praise to God?

 In other words, does Revelation 5:13 teach that even the demons and unredeemed humanity will join in forever adoring the wisdom of God’s sovereign plan for the cosmos?

 Greek scholar Robert Thomas puts it like this, “The entirety of intelligent life in God’s creation joins in, even fallen angels imprisoned ‘under the earth’ (Jude 6) and unredeemed humanity who must someday join in recognizing the preeminent qualities of God and the Lamb.”

 Revelation 5:13, And I heard every creature in heaven and on earth and under the earth and in the sea, and all that is in them, saying, “To him who sits on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honor and glory and might forever and ever!”

N.T. scholar G.K. Beale writes, “This scene anticipates the universal acclamation to be offered at the consummation of all things.  If it represents universal praise in an absolute sense, then it issues not only from God’s willing subjects but also from His opponents who will be forced into submission.”

Is this another shocking passage of Scripture like Philippians 2:9-11? Therefore also God highly exalted Him, and bestowed on Him the name which is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those who are in heaven, and on earth, and under the earth, and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

 OR is this passage simply trying to teach that all creation (excluding unredeemed man, the demons, etc) will one day join redeemed humanity and the Holy Angels in offering to God (Father and Son) the worship that He alone deserves?

 Psalm 69:34, Let heaven and earth praise Him, The seas and everything that moves in them.

 Romans 8:19-22, For the anxious longing of the creation waits eagerly for the revealing of the sons of God. For the creation was subjected to futility, not of its own will, but because of Him who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.

 I’ll let you know what i conclude once i come to a biblical conclusion.

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Gary Gaskins on August 6, 2009 at 12:36 pm

    I don’t see a problem with unredeemed humanity saying words of truth about the Savior, even as they suffer in eternal judgement. The truth, even from their lips, will glorify him (Philippians 2). What I have always wondered is, “What is in their hearts when they acknowledge the truth?”

    They are suffering, no question, so I can see two possibilities:

    1. They are eternally tormented with sadness, knowing that they had the opportunity to believe, but they rejected the truth which they now see. They do not love the Savior, and cannot. But they see enough truth that they “wish” they could repent, even though they can’t.
    2. They are eternally tormented with hatred, knowing that Jesus is Lord, in the sense of being in sovereign control, but still hating him, not wishing to repent, and always complaining that their punishment is unjust.

    Perhaps both, in a strange mixture? Sometimes one, sometimes another, typical of vacillating humans? Other possibilities? Anybody have a verse?

    Gary

  2. Beale uses the word IF in his paragraph (see below) but does not go into any more detail. That is not very helpful to me.

    “This scene anticipates the universal acclamation to be offered at the consummation of all things. IF it represents universal praise in an absolute sense, then it issues not only from God’s willing subjects but also from His opponents who will be forced into submission.”

    Kistemaker disagrees with Thomas and Beale, “I interpret the phraseology to be poetic language designed to incorporate everything God has made, for we cannot expect Satan and his followers in hell to utter praises to God.”

    Now v. 13 may very well be some type of metaphor because obviously animals can’t “say” or sing anything. V. 12 records a song of praise offered by the angels and v. 14 brings back in the the 4 Living Creatures (who i think are Cherubim) and the 24 elders (who i think represent the redeemed of God, most likely the redeemed church).

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