Ezekiel and the “call” to ministry

Daniel Block, reflecting on Ezekiel’s call to ministry in Ezek 3 notes an important theological implication concerning the “call” to ministry. His statement is not meant to be an exhaustive treatment of the subject yet it’s worth considering.

First, whoever would serve as a messenger of God must recognize that the calling comes from God alone. Neither the needs of the field, nor oratorical gifts, nor any other external qualifications authorize one to enter divine service. Moreover, the God who appoints his servants also defines the task, chooses the field of serivce, provides the message, and assumes repsonsibility for the outcome. The less evident the fruit for one’s ministry, the more critical is a clear sense of calling.

from Daniel I. Block, The Book of Ezekiel Chapters 1-24, NICOT, 130.

Advertisements

4 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Caleb Kolstad on January 20, 2011 at 2:13 pm

    When writing a book review be careful what you say (note example below). Don’t overstate your case and be gracious with other conservative scholars with whom you disagree (on non fundamental doctrines).

    “In recent times, little has weakened biblical theology more than the tendency to collapse all the rules and statutes of the Old Testament into one uniform corpus of law material… Dr. Philip Ross demonstrates not only that the division of the law into moral, civil and ceremonial categories arises out of a natural reading of the biblical text, but that its adoption in Patristic, Reformed and Puritan literature shows it to have been the orthodox position of the church. To lose this confessional distinctive is to drive an unbiblical wedge between the Testaments, and to eviscerate the gospel itself… An important corrective to much misunderstanding.”
    — Iain D Campbell, Minister, Point Free Church of Scotland, Isle of Lewis

    Review of “From the Finger of God: The Biblical and Theological Basis for the Threefold Division of the Law”

  2. Campbell’s statement, “To lose this confessional distinctive is to drive an unbiblical wedge between the Testaments, and to eviscerate the gospel itself” is overstated.

  3. Paul,

    I love this quote, “The less evident the fruit for one’s ministry, the more critical is a clear sense of calling.”

  4. The best summary that I’ve ever read on the role of the Law & New Covenant saints is found in Jason C Meyer’s “The End of the Law: Mosaic Covenant in Pauline Theology” (NAC Studies in Bible and Theology). Just buy this book and read his conclusion on pp 268-287. Meyer interacts with the view expressed in Dr. Ross’ new book on page 282-283.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: